Connect with us


It’s all go for Moat Goats



A family business: Meg and Damian McNamara with 4 month old Iori

GOAT farming couple Meg and Damian McNamara of Moat Village Farm, New Moat, Pembrokeshire, have been recognised for keeping the countryside vibrant by the Pembrokeshire FUW Countryside Business Award 2017.

The award, a £200 cash prize, perpetual trophy and a year’s free membership of the FUW, is presented every two years to someone who, 40 years of age or under, has developed their own business in rural Pembrokeshire.

“In presenting the award we recognise the fantastic work our young people are doing to keep our rural areas of Pembrokeshire vibrant and economically active places. Meg and Damian are very worthy winners of the award indeed and we can be proud to have such an inspirational farming couple in our midst,” said FUW Pembrokeshire County Executive Officer Rebecca Voyle.

Meg and Damian were both raised on dairy farms in Pembrokeshire, and always had a strong ambition to farm themselves. Although they both work outside of agriculture, Damian works as a Process Operator at Valero Refinery and Meg is a qualified Bank nurse, currently on Maternity Leave, they have managed to fulfil their farming ambition alongside keeping their day jobs. Meg also participated in the 2017 Agri Academy Business and Innovation Programme.

They bought their first land, a 12.5 acre field, in April 2015 and also farm 72 acres of Meg’s family’s farm. Their first goats arrived just 7 months later, having decided that this diversification would be both challenging and rewarding. Their herd now numbers 200 breeding female Boer goats.

Their agri-food business, Moat Goats, operates from farm to fork with home-bred kids reared by their dams. The male kids are finished for meat and the females are retained to increase the size of the breeding herd. Grass is grown both for grazing and for silage, with surplus sold for extra revenue. Mixed leys with herbs are also being tried to exploit health and production benefits.

Talking about a usual day on the farm Meg said: “We start by feeding the goats, checking and observing that they are ok, then it’s on to bedding down and we also spend time on farm work such as fieldwork and farm maintenance tasks. We also aim to post a picture or post on social media every day, as well as answering phone calls, responding to emails, and making sure that we market the business properly.”

As the male kids fatten and finish, Meg and Damian organise the slaughter in Maesteg, Bridgend and butchering of the carcasses locally at Cig Lodor, Rosebush. They then promote and sell the product online and started selling goat kid meat direct from the farm in October 2016. Now they supply meat boxes to customers throughout the UK via courier delivery, using social media for marketing. They have also supplied several local butchers with their goat meat, such as Chris Rogers in Carmarthen, T.G.Davies in Newport, Andrew Rees in Narberth, Gary the Butcher in Llandysul and DMS Llanelli and sell from the farm itself.

Speaking about the need to diversify, Meg explained: “We were aware that we needed to diversify in farming as we didn’t have enough land or time to compete with dairy, beef, sheep farmers.

“We experimented at home with jam making, cheese making, bought some heritage pigs before falling in love with 2 pet Boer cross goats and deciding to make a business from this interest.”

Meg and Damian exploit every opportunity to raise awareness of their quality produce, devising recipes, posting photos of the goats and the meals online and also supplied meat for a cookery demonstration at the 2017 Pembrokeshire County Show.

The business is going strong but there were some challenges the couple faced when setting the business up. Damian said: “The biggest challenge has been learning how to feed, handle and manage a goat herd – they require attention to detail which we have learnt through trial and error. Juggling farm and business commitments with family life and work off the farm remains an ongoing challenge especially with our young baby.”

Not ones to sit on their laurels, the couple are very aware that there are challenges the sector and their business faces. “Marketing and increasing our customer base remains a top priority for us but it’s also about raising awareness and promoting the benefits of goat meat – it’s low fat, low cholesterol, and high in iron.

“But of course, farming goats in north Pembrokeshire there is always the concern of a TB breakdown. So we take care of complying with all the necessary biosecurity and work hard to minimise contact with other herds,” said Meg.

Damian added: “We will deal with all of these challenges as a family unit and will continue to raise awareness of our business and the nutritional value of goat meat through social media. That way we hope to be selling more carcasses to the retail customer. We also intend to expand the business and therefore retain all the female kids for a few more years. Currently, we’re aiming for a herd of approximately 400 breeding females.”

It is clear that Meg and Damian are passionate about their produce and they encourage everyone to give goat meat a try.

“Goat meat is really tasty! It’s similar in texture to lamb and really easy to cook. Try something like pulled shoulder of goat kid or a simple quick-cook recipe such as chops, cutlets or sausages and have a look on our Facebook page for inspiration,” said Meg.


Future farm policy must not be piecemeal



James Gray: TFA Chair calls for holistic approach

THE TENANT Farmers Association’s National Chairman James Gray has stressed the importance of Government seeing the bigger picture in the development of post Brexit agricultural policy.

Speaking to the TFA’s AGM in London, Mr Gray warned about the dangers of addressing specific policy elements in isolation from the wider context within which farming operates.

“With the country’s decision to leave the European Union in a little over a year’s time, we have a unique opportunity to build a policy for agriculture on our own terms rather than those which have been the result of compromise with the other 27 Member States of the European Union. To do this successfully, the Government must work systematically,” said Mr Gray.

“Put at its most basic, what the new policy framework must address is how to ensure that as a nation we continue to deliver to consumers safe, good quality food, produced to high environmental, ethical and animal welfare standards at prices they can afford and which provide adequate returns to the farming community to cover costs, provide a living and produce a profit which enables reinvestment. It sounds simple to say but more complicated to deliver. It is only recently that we have seen something of the Government’s intention to address this conundrum and it is fair to say that we are some way off achieving a solid basis for taking this forward,” said Mr Gray.

“There will be much to do over the coming months to hone the future policy environment to ensure that we are ready for the brave new world beyond any implementation period agreed with the EU; notwithstanding the possibility of leaving the EU without a deal. The publication of the Government’s 64 page consultation document is a step along the way but it lacks sufficient detail in areas such as correcting market failures within supply chains, protecting animal welfare and environmental standards for food at our borders, promoting structural change and dealing with the challenges of labour supply both in primary agriculture and for first processors. All these areas have equal importance with the future of the Basic Payment and Agri-environment schemes about which the consultation has more to say,” said Mr Gray.

The TFA has also been encouraging landlords and tenants to use the pre-Brexit period for productive discussions about how both parties intend to deal with the opportunities and challenges which lie ahead and leaving discussions about levels of rent until later.

“With so much uncertainty the TFA has been encouraging tenant farmers to ensure that they are in a position to have a rent review available in either the autumn of next year or the spring of the following year when we should know more about the future of our relationship with the EU and the policy environment within which we will be operating,” said Mr Gray.

Continue Reading


FUW fights for fair funding for farming



Alan Davies: Barnett formula must not set farm funding

T​HE FARMERS’ UNION OF WALES has launched its ‘Fair Farm Funding’ campaign to highlight the urgent need for the UK Government to clarify funding for the sector in Wales, at its Grand Council meeting in Aberystwyth.

The campaign aims to secure fair funding for farmers in Wales after leaving the EU, ensuring that the industry does not receive less than it did before the UK left the European Union. It also insists that funding for farming should not be subject to the Barnett Formula.

Launching the campaign at the Union’s Grand Council, Managing Director Alan Davies said: “Historically the funding to support farming in Wales has come from the Common Agricultural Policy, but once the UK leaves the EU in March next year that link will be broken.

“Any funding to support agriculture will have to come from the UK Treasury. We’ve already heard that the Government will commit the same amount of funding to agriculture for the rest of this parliament. But there are complexities around how that funding might be allocated.

“If the UK Treasury matches, as is expected, the current EU payments of £3.5 billion to DEFRA to support UK agriculture, there are at least 2 ways in which that money can be allocated to Wales. One method and the one most often used in UK Government financial calculations is to use the Barnett Formula.”

Mr Davies explained that when “new” money is allocated to a government department, generally the “Barnett consequential” for Wales is around 5.6% of the total money allocated. That means that if DEFRA receive £3.5 billion, the “Consequential” for Wales will be around £196 million.

“Wales has historically received around 9.4% of the total EU CAP budget allocation to the UK. That would equate to £329 million. Barnett would reduce our funding by around 40% and that must not happen.

“In order to deliver Fair Farm Funding for Wales it is therefore essential that the UK Government allocate funds outside the Barnett formula. Wales urgently needs certainty that we will receive at least our historical share of the UK’s agricultural and rural development budget promised by Secretary of State Michael Gove, especially as the budget for next year needs to be in place by October this year,” he added.

Quoting Carwyn Jones the First Minister of Wales, Mr Davies told delegates that: “To achieve this will require a new way of working and the FUW was pleased to hear Welsh Government recognise that ‘agricultural funding will have to be held in a separate pot and dealt with in a different way’.”

FUW President Glyn Roberts added: “This year we celebrate 40 years of being formally recognised by the UK Government to exclusively speak on behalf of the farmers of Wales, and let me be clear, there have been few times during that period where the need for our Union has been greater – to fight for not just the survival of our family farms but for a prosperous future for our members and all those who make a living from agriculture.

“With this in mind, we are pleased to officially launch our ‘Fair Farm Funding’ campaign here today.”

Continue Reading


Warning on liver fluke rise



West Wales: Chronic fluke reported

THE PREDICTION by the National Animal Disease Information Service (NADIS) for a high risk of liver fluke disease in North, West and central Scotland, West Wales and Cornwall this winter have been borne out by incidences recorded over recent months.

Given the risk to both sheep and cattle, SCOPS and COWS have come together to remind producers that the high-risk warning followed a year with one of the wettest summers on record and higher than average rainfall in many parts of Great Britain. The risk in Eastern Scotland and parts of South West and Northern England is predicted to be medium and most of Central and Eastern regions of England were forecast to be at low risk.

Recent reports from members of SCOPS and COWS, including SAC Veterinary Services, APHA and others, support this general situation – but there are localised variations. This means it is very important that farmers talk to their vet, SQP or advisor to find out what is happening in their area, and decide what tests and risk assessment they need to carry out to investigate the situation on their own farm.

Now that we are into late winter, more cases of chronic and sub–acute liver fluke are being seen as the parasite matures in the host. Highlights of reports collated by SCOPS and COWS are as follows:


In Scotland, SRUC report that in terms of liver fluke incidence as a % of total submissions, 2017/18 has been the highest winter level since 2012/13.

In Wales, numerous cases have been reported by APHA. In January and February, cases of chronic fluke in Western England and West Wales are reported.

In Cumbria, cases of sub-acute and chronic liver fluke have been reported with chronic liver fluke in North Yorkshire.

In the Bristol area, abortions in a flock have were associated with the presence of liver fluke disease.

A large Welsh abattoir reports a further increase in lamb liver condemnations due to fluke, rising from 2.8% in October to 5% in November and from 7.3% in January to 10.5% in February. This is significantly higher than the same month a year ago (7.8%) and underlines the fact that this winter is carrying a higher risk.

SCOPS and COWS provide this advice to producers:

Reports of disease continue mainly from high-risk areas, but farmers should seek local information, assess risk and use tests, abattoir feedback and post mortems to inform on-farm control measures.

Re‐infection (when treated animals are put back on to contaminated areas) is still a concern. Farmers need to remember that flukicides do not have any persistent activity. We also now need to be thinking about chronic / sub-acute disease as fluke mature and damage the liver.

Poor pregnancy scanning results in sheep may be the first indication that there is a liver fluke problem on the farm and may be limited to only one group of sheep depending on the group’s autumn/winter grazing history.

Make sure clostridial vaccinations are up-to-date. Black disease is a major cause of losses in cattle (and sheep) that have livers damaged by liver fluke.

While most cases of disease are associated with sheep, cases of liver fluke are being reported in cattle (11% of cattle submissions to SRUC have been associated with liver fluke disease this winter). It is essential that cattle farmers are aware of the risks and discuss sampling/testing/flukicide options for different stock with their vet to avoid disease.

Product choice is critical.

This latter part of the liver fluke season is the time to consider taking pressure off triclabendazole products and swap to alternatives. These include closantel, nitroxynil and products that kill adult fluke, such as oxyclozanide, albendazole (and clorsulon for cattle).

Note restrictions on the use of flukicides in milking cows.

The SCOPS website and COWS website have specific pages providing information on suitable products to use.

Continue Reading
News1 day ago

Funeral of Kiara Moore to take place on her birthday

THE FUNERAL of Kiara Moore, the two-year-old who tragically died in the River Teifi in Cardigan on Monday (Mar 19),...

News1 day ago

Audit Committee will not make police response public

MEMBERS of the Audit Committee have given an undertaking not to disclose a letter from Dyfed-Powys Police relating to the...

News2 days ago

Haverfordwest Museum under threat as Town Council pull plug

HAVERFORDWEST MUSEUM faces an uncertain future, The Herald can reveal. At a meeting of Haverfordwest Town Council at which funding...

News2 days ago

Fishguard: Rise in parking charges branded ‘an absolute disgrace’

RESIDENTS of Fishguard have been debating the recent price hike for parking charges at the West Street car park, with...

News2 days ago

Police warn online trolls over ‘malicious’ Kiara comments

DYFED-POWYS POLICE have warned online trolls that they may take action against malicious comments relating to Kiara Moore, the 2-year-old...

News2 days ago

Cabinet supports three-weekly waste collections

PEMBROKESHIRE ​COUNTY COUNCIL’S Cabinet has unanimously supported the move to a three-weekly waste collection service. Cabinet members met on Monday...

News4 days ago

Two-year-old’s mother says she will ‘live with guilt’ following tragic death

THE MOTHER of Kiara Moore, a two-year-old girl who sadly died following an incident in the River Teifi in Cardigan...

News4 days ago

Pembroke Dock police urge caution following vehicle thefts

PEMBROKE DOCK police officers are investigating a number of reports of stolen vehicles and thefts of property from inside unlocked...

News4 days ago

Man charged with charity box theft

DYFED-POWYS POLICE have charged a Pembroke Dock man with the theft of a Morgan’s Fight charity box. Robert Williams, aged...

News5 days ago

Child airlifted to hospital after stolen car ends up in River Teifi

A THREE-YEAR-OLD is receiving medical attention in Cardiff after being in a car which was stolen in Carmarthenshire, and which...

Popular This Week