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The British obsession with possessions

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Screen Shot 2016-04-26 at 13.37.41A NEW survey has revealed that British people just love to hoard possessions, struggling to let go of items even when they know that they don’t need them and will never use them again.

The survey was conducted by insurance specialist RIAS to mark the start of National Spring Clean Week which kicks off today (Apr 14).

Results from the survey identified that 79% of people have at least one space in their home full of items that they’re fully aware they will never need again.

For 31% of people, that space is a drawer, 28% it is a cupboard and for a shocking 19%, that space is an entire room.

An astounding one in 10 people admitted that they had never had a clear-out of items they do not use or want any longer, but the majority of people, 64%, admitted to having a clearing once a year at most.

Yet, 79% of everyone questioned acknowledged that they were fully aware that they were holding onto items they no longer need, want or use purely for sentimental reasons.

The research also found that when moving home, which is a key opportunity to remove clutter and reappraise current belongings, many people decided to just take their ‘junk’ with them.

In fact, a whopping 55% of people who moved home in the last five years stated that they didn’t clear out any of their possessions when they moved. Once settled into their new home, 79% of people said they realised they had kept items that they shouldn’t have.

Psychologist Dr Elizabeth Forrester said: “People seem to struggle to let go of material things, often citing emotional attachment or sentimental reasons for holding onto unnecessary items.

“It seems to be a subconscious decision to simply hold onto things even though it’s known there’s no need to use for them anymore. Items are kept out of sight and never used, but hold comfort simply in the knowledge that they are there.

“For many people this ‘comfort’ extends from a kitchen drawer to occupying an entire room.”

To put these survey results to the test, RIAS put blogger Louise Parker in touch with Dr Forrester to help her take a less emotional view of possessions she no longer needed or wanted.

Having recently moved home, Louise was not one of the 55% of people who held onto everything through the move, instead opting to clear out a large portion of her unwanted items. However, she realised that she was still clinging onto a lot of her clothing, toiletries and other beauty items unnecessarily.

Louise said: “I was a little nervous about de-cluttering with Liz if I’m honest! I like to think I’m quite a streamlined person, so I really thought that there wouldn’t be anything that I would deem as clutter. However, my wardrobe and drawers that were bursting at the seams were telling a different story, so something really needed to be done!

“Liz’s approach was very simple. After putting all my clothes from my wardrobes and drawers, and secret suitcases filled with further clothes, on the bed, it was as easy as picking up each item one by one and really assessing whether I wanted it or needed it.

“Asking myself whether I actually wore it or if it was too similar to lots of my other clothes was a particularly handy approach. I found that I hadn’t really thought about many of the items of clothes for quite a while, just because I rarely saw them in my packed wardrobe!

“My drawers full of bottles, make-up and skincare were an area that really needed addressing. It was amazing the great feeling I got when I found something in amongst the clutter that I forgot I had.

“It was also really great to rid myself of the little sample sachets and bottles from magazines and make-up counters. Physically seeing the piles of stuff that I was happy to get rid of was quite a shock and that image will really stay with me when I next go into Boots!

“Another thing Liz taught me was to contemplate the amount of things I bring into the house every day, and whether I clear the same amount out. Now when I do choose to buy something new, I’ll be thinking about what I could get rid of to balance it out.”

Dr Forrester said: “Louise made some interesting comments about some of the items she’d struggled to discard. This applied to quite a few cosmetic items which had lain unused and unloved in the drawer

“Attempts to avoid unpleasant, negative feelings is a key reason for not tackling clutter. When Louise came face-to-face with these items, it reminded her of money she had spent on them, so getting rid of them felt wasteful, and led to further feelings of guilt.

“A self-confessed lover of shopping, I asked her about the feeling she experienced when she bought the items. When we shop, we see items that we desire and it often seems as if we will never get over that intense feeling of longing we experience.

In fact, that feeling has too often fizzled out before we’ve even set foot through the door and the item loses its magic. In a similar way, we may fear that the negative thoughts and emotions we get when contemplating getting rid of some unworn or unused purchases won’t go away either.

“By clearing out a significant amount of clutter, such as half-used tubes and bottles, and taking a novel approach to discarding her unwanted purchases, such as passing them onto friends and colleagues or a donation to a favourite charity, Louise had a very different experience.

“She found that, rather than being left with uncomfortable feelings, she got the same familiar buzz she would get when acquiring something new. What’s more, delighting friends with a nearly-new bargain, and being able to give some cash to a good cause, will give her some additional ‘feel good’ experiences.

“So, by having a good clear-out, it is possible to fall in love all over again with some things that have been languishing in the back of cupboards.”

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Community

Trecadwgan farm to be sold by auction

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PEMBROKESHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL has decided to sell Trecadwgan Farm by way of public auction.
The Council’s decision has been made in order to bring the sale process to a conclusion and give interested parties a fair and transparent opportunity to purchase Trecadwgan Farm.

The property was originally placed with a local agent for sale by way of public auction in July 2019 after the Council’s Cabinet resolved to sell the Farm on the open market to create a significant capital receipt.
However, it was withdrawn from public auction at the request of the community group known as ‘Save Trecadwgan Farm’ to give them an opportunity to prepare a business plan and seek finance in order to purchase the same on the open market.

Due to the interest shown in the Farm and the offers being made by interested parties, the Council decided that having withdrawn the property from public auction, to conduct the sale by way of private treaty.

Offers were made via the Council’s agent who undertook a standard sales process up to the set date whereby any party who made an offer were advised whether or not the offer made was the highest received.

As part of the process a local charitable foundation made the highest offer by the specified date to purchase the Property and accordingly the Council issued the draft documentation to their solicitors.

It is understood that the foundation had agreed to allow the local community group to use the Farm.

Notwithstanding that the terms and conditions of the transaction were disclosed to all interested parties in the particulars of sale, the foundation would not accept the contract conditions and subsequently withdrew their offer.

Having taken the advice of its agent, the Council agreed that the parties who made unsuccessful offers should be contacted to confirm whether they were still interested and if so to confirm the value of their offer.

At this time a third party who had not been part of the original offer process made the highest offer which again was accepted by the Council subject to contract.

Although the third party was not a party approached by the Council’s agent, as the third party had not previously made a bid, the offer was accepted on the basis of the Council’s duty under section 123 of the Local Government Act 1972 to obtain the best consideration which can reasonably be obtained. It is understood that the third party also intended to allow the Community group to occupy the Farm although the terms and conditions are unknown to the Council.

However, the statutory duty and supporting case law relevant to the sale of property by local authorities indicates that the Council has a duty to give consideration to any offer made to the Council.

The Council has now received a number of further higher offers to purchase the Farm.

“Having originally taken the property out of the auction at the request of the Community Group, the Council has, due to the statutory provisions found itself in a difficult and time consuming sales process,” said Cllr Bob Kilmister, Cabinet Member for Finance.

“Therefore to ensure that the sale process can be brought to a conclusion and ensure that all interested parties are given a fair and transparent opportunity to purchase the Farm, the Council has decided to sell the Farm by way of a public auction.”

Cllr Kilmister went on to explain that it is sound practice that local authorities should dispose of surplus land wherever possible.

“Generally it is expected that land should be sold for the best consideration reasonably obtainable,” he said.
“However, it is recognised that there may be circumstances where an authority considers it appropriate to dispose of land at an undervalue. Authorities should clearly not divest themselves of valuable public assets unless they are satisfied that the circumstances warrant such action.

“The General Disposal Consent (Wales) 2003 which enables the sale at an undervalue gives local authorities autonomy to carry out their statutory duties and functions, and to fulfil such other objectives as they consider to be necessary or desirable. However, when disposing of land at an undervalue, authorities must remain aware of the need to fulfil their fiduciary duty in a way which is accountable to local people.

“The Council has not resolved to use the general consent in this matter on the basis that the Farm will create a substantial capital receipt which is essential given the severe financial pressures the Council is presently facing.”

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Community

Assembly Member visits childcare centre in Milford Haven

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HAPPY DAYS Childcare Centre in Milford Haven were delighted to have a visit from Welsh Assembly member for the Conservative Party, Suzy Davies on February 7.

The minister, along with her colleague Stefan Rysewski, was given a tour of the setting and spent some time with the children and staff.

During her visit Ms. Davies was interested to know how some government initiatives were affecting Early Years and the Private Sector. Topics discussed included Use of Welsh Language, the new Apprenticeships Programme, Staff recruitment, Funding and Mental Health Schemes for Staff and Children.

Debbie Forrest, one of the owners of Happy Days commented that the visit had been very enjoyable, and how Ms Davies had been very responsive to all points raised giving her a better understanding of the challenges facing private businesses which she could take back to the assembly.

Happy Days Childcare Centre in Milford Haven and Haverfordwest are owned by Debbie Forrest and Helen Mathias and have been operating in Pembrokeshire for almost 30 years. Both settings offer a variety of services for children up to age 12 in order to support families with their work/life balance and childcare needs.

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Community

COUNTY COUNCIL WINS ‘INSPIRATIONAL EMPLOYER’ AWARD

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Pembrokeshire County Council has been named an ‘Inspirational Employer’ at a ceremony in Cardiff for Welsh employers. The award was presented on Wednesday (5 th February) by the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP). It recognises the Council’s achievement not only in becoming the first local authority in Wales to achieve the Disability Confident Leader
status but also the work that it has done through Norman Industries and Workways+ to support people with disability and long term health conditions to gain paid work. Norman Industries is the Haverfordwest-based factory employing people with disabilities.

The award was collected by Karen Davies – project manager for the Council’s supported employability projects – and Rachel Bailey who was a Workways+ participant but now works for the Authority as a Learning Disability Champion for Employability.

The journey to Disability Confident Leader began when Rachel – who has cerebral palsy – gave a presentation at a DWP conference in December 2018 about the work she has been doing to promote employment for people with learning disabilities.

The process culminated in the Council achieving Disability Confident Leader status in September 2019.

Through this process the County Council was able to demonstrate the extensive support that it provides both in its own workforce and through projects like Norman Industries and Workways+. Said Karen: “Becoming a Disability Confident Leader was the culmination of a lot of work by a number of people including the Council’s Human Resources department.
“Pembrokeshire County Council is definitely leading the way in employing people with disability with over 60 people working within Norman Industries and Workways+ alone. “We have been able to demonstrate the benefit of employing people with disability and there is now interest across the council to open up employment opportunities.

Rachel revealed that working at Norman Industries had given her a lot more confidence.

She explained: “It has provided me with a purpose to be able to work. I really enjoy going out to events and I like getting the message across to people that being employed with disabilities and learning disabilities means that it is achievable.”

The inaugural Disability Confident awards attracted nominations from across Wales for employers and organisations who have shown outstanding commitment to the Disability Confidence campaign. The Council was nominated by Alyson Phillips, DWP’s Partnership Manager in Pembrokeshire.

RACHEL’S STORY
In September 2018 Rachel was a participant of Workways+. She really wanted a job – her first ever paid job – and worked with her Employment Mentor to consider work opportunities. When the opportunity to become a Learning Disability Champion came up, it seemed like a good match. Rachel does not have learning disabilities but her physical disability means that she understands the issues. With the help of her mentor Rachel applied for the job. Due to her pronounced speech impediment, the team at Norman Industries needed to amend the interview process to ensure that Rachel had a fair chance to demonstrate her ability in the interview.

Having accepted the offer, the team then worked with Rachel and Access to Work to ensure that she had the support both with physical adaptations and support in work to ensure she could do the job.

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