Connect with us
Advertisement
Advertisement

News

Fine for assault on partner

Published

on

magA PENNAR man who pleaded guilty to a charge of assault was fined a total of £230 at Court on Wednesday (Jan 14). Kofi Gidman, aged 20 of Stranraer Road, had originally pleaded not guilty to a charge of assault by beating which had been altered by the CPS. Prosecuting the case, Nick Newton said: “The complainant has never alleged a physical assault. The allegation of assault was put to him in the interview and a colleague of mine has made a mistake. “The two parties involved in this case are in a relationship and it is still ongoing.

“The incident happened at an address in Milford Haven when there was an argument over money. The couple went to sleep but when they woke up on the morning of October 23 the argument continued. “Gidman threatened to leave the property with the Christmas presents and he said to her: ‘you’re a c***, if you hit me, I’ll f****** kill you’.

“She rang the police while Gidman was pacing around the flat, then he raised his fist to her to punch but she moved out of the way. “He clenched his fist again but she left the flat. She was later seen outside the flat crying. “The police arrived and Gidman was arrested. He denied the threat in the interview as he claimed that the complaint was false and that the victim’s mother put her up to making the complaint. “His last conviction was in February 2014 when he was given a 12-month community order for an Affray.”

Defending Jonathan Webb said: “Upon the beating element of the charge being dropped the defendant pleads guilty. The parties were at home and a row ensued. He threatened to take the Christmas presents. He has made the threat and made fists, putting them towards the complainants face. He accepts this is a gesture. “He thought she had called him the N-word. Nevertheless this was a conditional threat and is at the lowest end of the scale.” Gidman was fined £110 for the offence, ordered to pay a £20 victim surcharge and costs of £100.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News

Welsh charity’s efforts for independent living earn top UK health award

Published

on

CARE & REPAIR CYMRU, a Welsh charity, has been honored with a prestigious national award for its impactful endeavors in aiding vulnerable older individuals and those with disabilities to maintain independent living within their own homes. The judges were notably impressed by the organization’s initiatives to facilitate the smooth transition of older individuals returning home from hospitals, thereby reducing hospital readmissions due to substandard housing conditions and alleviating strain on local NHS services.

Selected from a pool of over 500 charities across the UK, Care & Repair Cymru (CRC) has been named one of the ten winners of the 2024 GSK IMPACT Awards, conducted in collaboration with The King’s Fund. This recognition, now in its 27th year, celebrates excellence within the charity sector, specifically acknowledging the exceptional contributions of small to medium-sized charities dedicated to enhancing people’s health and well-being in the UK.

As a recipient of this esteemed award, Care & Repair Cymru will receive £40,000 in unrestricted funding along with expert support and leadership development opportunities facilitated by The King’s Fund, a leading health and care charity.

Extensive research underscores the profound impact of living conditions on health and well-being. Established in 1991, Care & Repair Cymru’s initiatives encompass aiding in hospital discharge processes and averting hospital admissions by enhancing and adapting the residences of those at risk. Their services are comprehensive, person-centered, and tailored to individual needs.

In Wales, where 85% of older people are homeowners, there’s a strong desire among the elderly population to age in place. However, Wales boasts the oldest housing stock in the UK, with over a quarter of all housing built before 1919. Substandard or unsafe housing elevates the risk of falls, with approximately 50% of individuals aged 80 and above experiencing at least one fall annually. Moreover, inadequate housing conditions incur substantial costs to the Welsh NHS, with excess cold, dampness, and mold alone costing over £95 million annually. A significant portion of excess winter deaths among older individuals can be attributed to respiratory illnesses stemming from living in cold homes.

As the national body overseeing the efforts of 13 Care & Repair agencies spanning all 22 counties in Wales, Care & Repair Cymru’s Managing Better program targets some of the most vulnerable older individuals. This initiative offers a range of free services aimed at enhancing the independence and safety of individuals living with conditions such as dementia, sensory loss, or those who have suffered a stroke.

The award judges lauded Care & Repair Cymru for spearheading the Hospital to Healthier Home program, which aims to mitigate delayed discharge from hospitals and reduce readmission rates. Through close collaboration with NHS staff, Care & Repair agencies swiftly identify patients residing in unsuitable housing conditions and promptly implement necessary adaptations, free of charge, ensuring safe and timely discharge.

Additionally, the charity’s advocacy efforts spotlight the housing needs of Welsh homeowners and underscore the detrimental effects of poor housing conditions on the health of older individuals. By collating and presenting data, CRC contributes to evidence-based policy enhancements and actively supports endeavors toward establishing a new right to affordable and adequate housing.

Data compiled by the charity illustrates the substantial impact of their initiatives, with 62,607 older individuals supported to maintain independent living at home in the 2022/23 period. The agencies conducted £18.3 million worth of housing repair and improvement work, completed 20,438 adaptations, and secured £9.5 million in unclaimed benefits for service users.

Katie Pinnock, Director of UK Charitable Partnerships at GSK, emphasized the pivotal role of housing in enhancing people’s health and reducing hospitalizations. She commended Care & Repair Cymru for their steadfast advocacy, collaborative partnerships, and innovative programs that not only support vulnerable individuals but also alleviate pressure on overstretched NHS and social care services.

Expressing gratitude for the recognition, Chris Jones, CEO of Care & Repair Cymru, underscored the organization’s commitment to advocating for healthy homes and providing essential support to thousands of older individuals in Wales, thereby easing the burden on NHS services.

The GSK IMPACT Awards program aims to foster leadership development within the charity sector, and all winners are invited to participate in a tailored leadership development program administered by The King’s Fund.

Continue Reading

News

Why some want the Falkland Islands flag flown over Pembrokeshire

Published

on

A CALL to raise the flag of the Falklands Islands at Pembrokeshire’s County Hall will be heard later this week.

In a submitted question, which will be answered at the March 7 meeting of Pembrokeshire County Council, Councillor Huw Murphy will ask: “Would the Leader of Pembrokeshire County Council [Cllr David Simpson] agree to the raising of the Falkland Islands flag on June 14, 2024, outside County Hall?

“June 14 is Liberation Day within the Falkland Islands to celebrate the return of democratic rule following an illegal military occupation by Argentina. The restoration of democracy to the Falkland Islands on June 14, 1982, ultimately returned democratic rule to Argentina.

“The purpose of raising the Falklands flag at County Hall on June 14 is to remind us of the ultimate sacrifice made by 255 service personnel serving our country during the Falklands war.

“Poignantly 22 of those lost in the conflict were serving on HMS Ardent, a Royal Navy destroyer sunk on May 22, 1982. HMS Ardent has a close association with the county of Pembrokeshire through its affiliation with Milford Haven.

“The raising of the Falklands flag at County Hall will have great resonance for the town of Milford Haven and for members of the HMS Ardent association, in that their service many years ago is still remembered.”

The flag of the Falkland Islands features the Union flag in the top left along with a coat of arms featuring a ram and a ship, The Desire, which discovered the islands.

Cllr Murphy’s call to raise the flag at County Hall, Haverfordwest will be answered at the March 7 meeting, one of 35 items on the agenda, including the controversial potential council tax rise of 16.3 per cent.

Continue Reading

Charity

Fishguard RNLI celebrates first female Coxswain in Wales, as charity marks 200th year 

Published

on

ON MONDAY, March 4, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) will celebrate 200 years of saving lives at sea. Fishguard RNLI Lifeboat Station is celebrating being both the oldest lifeboat station in Wales, as well as being the first Welsh station to have a female Coxswain. 

On the day the charity turns 200, the RNLI is revealing its volunteer lifeboat crews and lifeguards in west Wales have saved an incredible 3,891 lives during its two centuries of lifesaving.  

Since the charity was founded in 1824, its volunteer crews in west Wales have launched the lifeboats 14,872 times, saving 3,776 lives, while its lifeguards – who became part of the RNLI’s lifesaving service in 2001 – have responded to 8,865 incidents, saving 115 lives*.  In total across the UK and Ireland, 146,452 lives have been saved by the RNLI – this equates to an average of two lives saved every day for 200 years.  

Since 1824, the four lifeboat stations in Ceredigion have launched 4,848 times and saved 1,238 lives. In Pembrokeshire, the five stations have launched 8,563 times and saved 2,395 lives. Burry Port station in Carmarthenshire has launched 1,461 times and has saved 143 lives.  

Fishguard Lifeboat Station on the far west coast of Pembrokeshire was the first lifeboat station to be established in Wales. Originally established in 1822, Fishguard’s first lifeboat was built by locals. In 1855, local inhabitants requested that the RNLI take over the station. 

The station has also made RNLI history by being the first station in Wales to appoint a female Coxswain – Gemma Gill. Gemma has recently passed out as Coxswain and is thoroughly enjoying her new role.  

Gemma joined the RNLI in 2001 serving as a volunteer for North Berwick and Aberystwyth RNLI before becoming a full-time staff member.  

Gemma said:  ‘The first person to take me to sea on a lifeboat was a woman called Rhona, and she told me “don’t let other people decide what you’re capable of,” which has always stuck with me. 

‘While I believe it’s a matter of skills and experience rather than gender, I recognise the significance of this milestone. 

‘We’ve come a long way from the image of a lifeboatman in his oilskins, and, as the first woman to become an RNLI coxswain in Wales, I hope to inspire other women and girls to join the lifeboat crew.’ 

Although not officially part of the early lifeboat crews, women have always played an active role in the work of the RNLI, from the ‘lady launchers’ who played key roles at lifeboat stations assisting in the launching and recovery of vessels, to fundraisers such as Marion Macara who helped to organise the first recorded charity street collection in Manchester in 1891.  

Throughout its history, Fishguard lifeboat station has been awarded 28 medals. One gold, 18 silver and nine bronze. Today the station operates a D-class inshore lifeboat Edward Arthur Richardson as well as a Trent class Blue Peter VII.   

While much has changed in 200 years, two things have remained the same – the charity’s dependence on volunteers, who give their time and commitment to save others, and the voluntary contributions from the public which have funded the service for the past two centuries.  

Jo Partner, RNLI Head of Region for Wales says:  ‘I am immensely grateful to everyone who is involved with the charity across Wales – our volunteers, supporters and staff. Today is a hugely significant day in our history and an occasion we should all be very proud of. I know there are lots of events being planned across Wales to mark this very special day and I hope people enjoy being part of this special piece of history.   

 ‘I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all those who play a part in making the RNLI the proud organisation is it today – which really is a cause for celebration.’   

RNLI Heritage Archive and Research Manager, Hayley Whiting, says: ‘The RNLI’s founder, Sir William Hillary, witnessed the treacherous nature of the sea first-hand when living on the Isle of Man and he wanted to take action. His first appeal to the nation in 1823 did not have the desired result but, thankfully, he persevered and gained the support of several philanthropic members of society, who put their names to the charity at a meeting in the City of London Tavern on 4 March 1824.  

‘Twelve resolutions were passed at that meeting, the core of which still stand as part of the RNLI’s Charter 200 years later. This shows how the RNLI’s values and purpose have remained unwavering for 200 years, despite the social and economic changes and challenges of the past two centuries.  

‘Hillary’s vision was ambitious and forward-thinking, and no doubt he would be extremely proud to see the charity he founded still going strong today, and to see how much it has achieved.’ 

The charity has a history of innovation, and adapting to challenging circumstances, such as: 

Lifejackets: In 1861, Whitby lifeboat crew launched six times to rescue stricken vessels in a storm, but on their sixth launch a freak wave capsized the lifeboat and all but one of the crew were lost. The sole survivor was Henry Freeman, who survived because he was wearing a new design of cork lifejacket. After this event, the cork lifejacket became more widely adopted by lifeboat crews.  

Fundraising: In 1886, 27 lifeboat crew members from Southport and St Annes lost their lives while trying to rescue the crew of the Mexico. A public appeal was launched, driven by local man Charles Macara. An 1891 appeal raised £10,000 in two weeks. On 1 October, Charles and his wife Marion organised the first Lifeboat Saturday. Bands, floats and lifeboats paraded through the streets of Manchester, followed by volunteers collecting money. More than £5,000 was taken on the day, which was the first recorded example of a charity street collection. 

Lifeboats: In 1914, over 140 people were saved when the hospital steamship Rohilla was wrecked. The ship had been en route to Dunkirk to help wounded soldiers but was broken up when it ran aground on rocks near Whitby.  Five lifeboats battled terrible seas to reach the ship.  A motor lifeboat (the first of its kind) from Tynemouth, took the last 50 people on board. In total, 144 people were saved by the crews, who worked for over 50 hours in atrocious conditions. The motor lifeboat proved its capabilities and became more widely accepted by lifeboat crews after this event.  

Wartime: When the First World War broke out, many lifeboat volunteers were called away to fight. The average age of lifeboat crews at home increased to over 50. During 1914-18, RNLI lifeboats launched 1,808 times, saving 5,332 lives.  In 1939, young lifeboat volunteers were called away again to war. By the end of the Second World War, RNLI crews had saved 6,376 lives around the coasts of Britain and Ireland.  

In 1940, 19 RNLI lifeboats were used to evacuate troops from Dunkirk. Two had RNLI crews onboard, while the others were crewed by the Royal Navy. The lifeboats and their stand-in crews saved thousands of lives while being shelled and bombed for days.  

Throughout its bicentenary year, the charity is running events and activities to remember its important history and celebrate the modern lifesaving service it is today, while hoping to inspire generations of future lifesavers and supporters.   

A Service of Thanksgiving to mark 200 years of the RNLI will take place at Westminster Abbey on 4 March 2024 at 11.30am. It will be attended by representatives from RNLI lifesaving communities around the UK and Ireland.  

For further information about the RNLI’s 200th anniversary, visit RNLI.org/200

*Statistics from RNLI Operational Data from 4 March 1824 to 31 December 2023 inclusive. A life saved shows how many of the people helped by the RNLI would have lost their life had the RNLI not been there.  

Continue Reading

News20 mins ago

Why some want the Falkland Islands flag flown over Pembrokeshire

A CALL to raise the flag of the Falklands Islands at Pembrokeshire’s County Hall will be heard later this week....

Charity8 hours ago

Fishguard RNLI celebrates first female Coxswain in Wales, as charity marks 200th year 

ON MONDAY, March 4, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) will celebrate 200 years of saving lives at sea. Fishguard...

News23 hours ago

Council accused of coercing councillors into approving historic tax increase

IN AN UNFOLDING scandal at Pembrokeshire County Council, councillors are reportedly being pressured to endorse what could be the UK’s...

Entertainment23 hours ago

Symphonica Tywi presents ‘Film Fantastics’ – A cinematic musical journey

SYMPHONICA TYWI has announced the return of their annual musical extravaganza “Film Fantastics” for its thirty-first tour, featuring classic film...

Business2 days ago

£1m boost for marine, fisheries and aquaculture industry in Wales

£1 MILLION of Welsh Government funding is being made available to boost the marine, fisheries and aquaculture industry in Wales,...

Crime2 days ago

Milford couple were out drug dealing, whilst child, 10, slept at home alone

SWANSEA CROWN COURT heard this week that a Pembrokeshire couple were dealing large amounts of cannabis and cocaine. It was...

Crime3 days ago

Detectives investigating the death of boy, 15, near Lampeter

Dyfed-Powys Police is investigating the circumstances surrounding the sudden death of a 15-year-old boy at a location near Lampeter on...

Community4 days ago

Oyster restoration project set to enrich the Haven Waterway

AN EXCITING new project is underway to restore the once-abundant population of native oysters within the Milford Haven Waterway and,...

News5 days ago

A48 shut after car hits traffic light pole in early hours accident

IN THE EARLY hours of Thursday morning (Feb 29), a serious road traffic accident prompted police presence on the A48...

Farming5 days ago

Thousands of farmers descend on Cardiff to say: ‘Enough is enough!’

THOUSANDS of farmers and supporters converged outside the Senedd in Cardiff, Wales, to voice their strong opposition to the Welsh...

Popular This Week