Connect with us
Advertisement
Advertisement

Community

Missing out on bedtime stories

Published

on

Encouraged to read: Bookish charity BookStart found that only 37% of children in Wales are read to before bed

Encouraged to read:
Bookish charity BookStart found that only 37%
of children in Wales are read to before bed

SHOCKING statistics which have been revealed by Booktrust, Britain’s largest reading charity, have shown that only a measly 37% of children in Wales are read a bedtime story before they go to sleep.

This research has been conducted as part of BookTrust’s drive to get children and families into the habit of reading together every day while children are still young.

Evidence has shown that by reading together every day, parents will help their children to be almost 12 months ahead of their age group when they start school.

For busier parents, even reading to children three to five times a week gives them up to a six-month head-start over those who are read to less often.

Wales’ result is much lower than any other region in the UK except for London, where only a meagre 28% of children are read a book by a family member in the 20 minutes before they go to sleep.

Cardiff fared particularly badly in the results, with parents and carers in the Welsh capital less likely to read to their children before bedtime than any other city in the UK.

Only 30% of children in Cardiff said that they read with a family member before going to bed, compared to 55% of children in Bristol, the highest scoring city, and 42% as a UK wide average.

Making reading a bedtime story part of your nightly routine can have real benefits for both children and tired parents.

Diana Gerald, CEO of BookTrust, said: “Reading together at any time of day has real benefits, but there’s something extra special about a bedtime story.

“Children need to feel safe and secure when they sleep, and reading together creates a special quiet time to wind down together.

“Storytime also enhances children’s vocabulary and literacy skills, and enables them to foster a love of reading.’

Through its Bookstart programme, BookTrust is hoping to support families to make sure that reading together every day remains a top priority.

Through Bookstart, every child in Wales can receive free English and Welsh books in their first year of life and again when they are two years old.

Between Monday (Jun 6) and Sunday (Jun 12), the charity will be celebrating National BookStart Week, working with libraries and various early years teams across Wales.

This year’s theme of ‘Under the Sea’ is based on the fun picture book ‘A Hole in the Bottom of the Sea’ by Jessica Law, which will be given free to every child who attends the National Bookstart Week events.

National Bookstart Week was launched at Rhyl SeaQuariaum on Monday (June 6), with a fun family event led by Denbighshire Libraries’ BookStart Team.

There are hundreds of free events for babies, toddlers, preschoolers and their families which are being held at libraries, nurseries and in early years sessions across the country. Events include stories, rhymes and lots of fun activities to inspire families to read together and enjoy books.

Bethan Hughes, Customer Service Manager at Denbighshire Libraries, said: “Reading and sharing books every day has huge benefits for all children, however young they are.

“Children who read and enjoy books are happier, healthier and do better in life than those who don’t.

“Local libraries welcome children from birth and offer free access to fabulous children’s books – for bedtime stories and reading at any time of day.”

More information about National BookStart Week, as well as fun activities for families, can be found on the BookStart website.

BookStart is funded by the Welsh Government’s Department for Education and Skills and delivered in partnership with Welsh libraries and Health Visitors.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Community

Ambitious community project to capture untold stories from across Pembrokeshire

Published

on

MILFORD HAVEN’S Torch Theatre is launching ‘The Pembrokeshire Story’, an exciting new community project that aims to connect people across generations in celebrating the Pembrokeshire spirit.

We all love a good story, but they are especially good if they throw light on the place that we are from. The Pembrokeshire Story is trying to bring local artists and our community together by mapping the county through everyday stories told by the people who live here. A story might be something as simple as how life has changed over the years or it might be a special event that you would want to remember. So often these stories remain as legends within our own families, but this is a chance to share them with the world. Everyone has a story to tell and this project will facilitate these stories to be recorded and remembered for generations to come.

The inspiration behind the project originated from the Torch Theatre’s Artistic Director, Peter Doran, who, whilst caring for his father who was suffering with Covid-19 at the start of the pandemic in 2020, encouraged his father to elaborate on stories which previously he had only touched on in passing.

Peter said: “My father told us of his time as an evacuee, having been sent from his home in Liverpool to the Welsh speaking village of Llamberis in North Wales. It was a fascinating tale and one that we might never have heard about had it not been for Covid-19. We’re all so busy, I feel we just don’t spend enough time with each other to allow these wonderful moments to happen, we’re all so busy it would seem.”

Peter’s father has thankfully gone on to make a full recovery from Covid-19 and is continuing to tell many more stories.

The Pembrokeshire Story is being led by Tenby based creative James Williams, who has assembled a team of freelance artists to capture extraordinary stories in different mediums from across the county. These stories are only part of the project and the Torch Theatre requires your help to capture your stories told across the generations.

James added: “Local artists have already been working to gather stories from over the county, and now we’d like to ask you to join in. We are putting out a call for videos made by young people where they interview their grandparents or older relatives about their experiences and stories of Pembrokeshire. These videos will be added to an online Living Archive which will be available for anyone to access.”

All the stories submitted will be added to the Living Archive on the Pembrokeshire Story website which will be launched in April. Videos can be made on a phone or recorded from a digital platform call (ideally filmed in landscape), they can be in English or in Welsh but must be no longer than 5 minutes.

If you would prefer not to film your submission, we would be happy to receive your story as an audio recording (mp3 format) or in writing, with an accompanying photograph.

For more information visit https://www.torchtheatre.co.uk/the-pembrokeshire-story/

If you would like to submit a story, please contact James Williams via this email address marketing@torchtheatre.co.uk

Continue Reading

Community

NHS worker from Pembroke Dock raises over £1,550 in a sponsored challenge

Published

on

An NHS worker from Pembroke Dock has raised over £1,550 in a sponsored challenge with her husband Edd, having been inspired by the support their young niece received as a baby at Glangwili Hospital Special Care Baby Unit.

Donna Reed works in the Communications Team at Hywel Dda University Health Board and wanted to do her bit to say thanks to everyone who nursed Layla and supported the family for several weeks when she arrived very early in 2012.

Donna says, “Born at just 3lbs, Layla is now a beautiful, bubbly and full of beans eight-year-old. As a family we’d like to give something back to the staff who cared for Layla when she was so tiny.”

Donna and Edd raised over £1,000 on a JustGiving page and a donation of £500 was made by Edd’s employer, Valero Energy Ltd, where he works as a Process Operator.

Karen Jones, a Senior Nurse thanked the couple for their efforts. She said, “We really appreciate what Donna and Edd have done to support us. Donations like this are used to purchase items for parents and babies in order for their stay to be more comfortable and to help make the stay less stressful – items such as parent pamper packs, items for the parent’s sitting room and overnight room baby’s journal, items to support breast feeding and items to support premature babies development. They are also used to support specialist neonatal training for staff and purchase specialist neonatal equipment.”

Donna and Edd are planning a series of physical challenges through the year. Donna adds, “A year on since I started fundraising for Glangwili Hospital’s SCBU, and after all but one of my events last year were postponed, I decided to take on a very unique challenge to raise another £100 to get to my target.

“I ran the Narberth Nobbler’s 4 x 4 x 48 challenge between March 5-7. The event involved me and Edd running 4 miles every 4 hours for 48 hours, a total of 48 miles over the weekend. This is an incredibly tough endurance event that will test our stamina, perseverance and mettle.”
Layla’s mother Rebeca said, “As Layla was born prematurely it was a very worrying time, however we knew she was in the best hands in SBCU as they built her up to a healthy weight and did everything they could to reassure us as parents.

“We are so grateful for the care and support that staff gave to Layla and to our family, and to my sister and Edd for raising money for the unit.”
Donna also plans to take part in Broad Haven Triathlon, Cardiff Half Marathon and Snowdon Marathon Eryri, providing they go ahead.
Donna would like to thank everyone who’s supported her fundraising so far and is encouraging people to donate if they can, “Any amount, no matter how small, will help make a difference and 100% of funds raised will go towards helping babies like Layla and their families,” she says.

Continue Reading

Community

Great Western Railway and the Fishguard Ocean Port – How WWI dashed ambitious plans for Fishguard

Published

on

by Doug Evans

ALTHOUGH Fishguard Port is best known now for its easy route to Ireland, it was once part of an ambitious plan to take trans-Atlantic passengers away from the likes of Plymouth and Southampton.

In 1889, the Great Western Railway rook over the North Pembrokeshire and Fishguard Railway, and in preparation of turning Fishguard into a purpose-built ocean liner port, the GWR opened its first station, Fishguard & Goodwick railway station, in 1899 while work on the new port began with the construction of Fishguard Harbour’s East breakwater.

The overlooking village of Harbour Village was built to accommodate workers and the necessary 27 acres site and 900 metre breakwater were provided by blasting 1.6 million tonnes of rock from the cliff face.

A new line would connect the proposed liner terminal on the East Breakwater to the West Wales line. The new 2 mile route, which would have bypassed the steeper gradients and curves on this part of the original line, would have included a deep cutting, embankments and two tunnels.

However, the project to build a breakwater and an ocean-going terminal was abandoned after it became clear silting (which could not be prevented by dredging) would stop large ocean-going ships from using the port.

Local legend has it that the engineer responsible for this mistake committed suicide after realising the port was not suitable for its intended purpose. Another local myth suggests that the breakwater was deliberately built this way as locals didn’t want the harbour to become too large.

The East Breakwater was left unfinished. Two short sections of the planned railway to the new port terminal were completed before the project was ended.

In 1906, Fishguard and West Wales was visited by the largest ship in the world at the time the RMS Mauretania.

Fishguard Harbour, from above

An archived pamphlet for the Fishguard Port from 1913 provides a fascinating insight into the journey from America to London at the time.

It reads: “Fishguard is situated on the south-west coast of Wales, and is the nearest British port to New York used by Atlantic liners. It affords the quickest means of reaching London, and is also a convenient port for the Continent.

“In addition, many parts of England and Wales are within easy access of Fishguard; the Metropolis is 262 miles away and this distance is covered in under five hours.

“Tickets for seats in the special train from Fishguard to London will be furnished to Saloon passengers holding railway coupons. Passengers who do not hold coupons can purchase same at Purser’s Office before leaving the steamer.

“Single tickets and outward halves of return tickets between Fishguard and London are available for three months if purchased in America, or if issued in exchange for vouchers obtained in America. In other circumstances they are available for ten days.

“The baggage of London-bound passengers is ready labeled, “London, via Fishguard,” the lettering being white on a purple ground, the bold lettering and the distinctive coloring precluding the possibility of confusion.

“The route from Fishguard to London, passing through the industrial centres in South Wales and the charming scenes of the Thames valley, is full of interest.

“The speed at which the run is covered is the most potent tribute to the excellence of the Great Western’s iron road and their rolling stock.  Only one stop is made, and this of a very short duration, at Cardiff.

“Between the Fishguard of today and that of even a decade ago there is a great difference. A bay which boasted but of a departing or rather departed fishing industry, and was visited by only a few coastwise traders and fishing craft seeking shelter, has been converted into a splendid harbour, a harbour in which great natural advantages have been ably supplemented by the works which the Great Western Railway Company have constructed.

“At the quay by the railway station the splendid fleet of turbine steamers running between Fishguard and Rosslare (Ireland) are berthed, and here are the most modern appliances for the speedy transfer from ship to train, or vice versa, of goods and baggage.”

Although the ambitious plans for Fishguard were not to be, the Port continues to this day, providing crossings to Rosslare with the Superferry Stena Europe providing two daily crossings all year round.

Transport for Wales operate from Fishguard Harbour and have special trains to connect with the arrival and departures of the Stena Line Superferry Stena Europe that operates to/from Rosslare.

Continue Reading
News4 hours ago

Police: RNLI ‘most likely saved man’s life’ following tombstoning incident

POLICE have issued an urgent warning following a tombstoning incident Tenby on Saturday evening (Apr 10). A multi-agency operation was...

News1 day ago

Police plan to deter badly behaved youths from gathering in Tenby

POLICE in Tenby responded to community concerns over antisocial behaviour and groups of between 15-20 youths gathering and clashing over...

News2 days ago

Prince Philip, The Duke of Edinburgh, dies aged 99

The Duke of Edinburgh, the Queen’s ‘strength and stay’ for 73 years, has died aged 99. Prince Philip’s health had...

Health2 days ago

Covid-19 restriction relaxations in Wales brought forward

THE WELSH GOVERNMENT will be accelerating elements of its programme to relax Covid-19 restrictions as cases of new infections continue...

News2 days ago

Inquest into death of Judith Rhead adjourned pending murder inquiry outcome

THE INQUEST into the death of a murdered Pembroke Dock woman was opened and then adjourned on Thursday (Apr 8.)...

News2 days ago

Jail over wounding and chisel charges

A PEMBROKE DOCK man convicted of wounding with intent, and possession of a chisel in a public place, has been...

News2 days ago

Lola’s inquest adjourned due to police investigation

THE inquest into the death of local toddler Lola James who tragically died after sustaining a severe head injury was...

News3 days ago

Where’s Wally: Has Tenby Walrus disappeared for a quiet life?

TENBY’S most famous visitor, Wally The Walrus, has disappeared after being repeatedly disturbed by members of the public getting too...

News4 days ago

Weatherman Walking TV series visits Pembrokeshire

DEREK BROCKWAY is back exploring Wales’ coast and in the second episode of the new series of Weatherman Walking: The...

News4 days ago

RNAD Trecwn could be ‘ticking time bomb’ says Greenpeace

BUILT just before World War II RNAD Trecwn, during its working life, was used to store and distribute various munitions...

Popular This Week