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Farming

Pembrokeshire gets Nature Fund cash

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naturefundTHE MINISTER for Natural Resources, Alun Davies has set out how a £6m Nature Fund will be used to help halt the decline of wildlife and habitats in Wales. 

The Minister said that the fund would support practical action to improve Wales’ environment and called on owners, farmers, conservationists and other interested parties to work together to take advantage of the funding and the associated economic and social benefits it could bring. Alun Davies said: “Last year’s State of Nature report was a big wake-up call and highlighted dramatic declines in a range of habitats and species across Wales. I am determined that we will use this £6m Nature Fund not just to tackle that decline, but also to enhance Wales’ biodiversity and improve our environment and crucially to do so in a way that supports the resilience of our communities and Wales’ economy. ‘It is evident from the State of Nature report that traditional approaches to managing our biodiversity haven’t worked and that more joined up inclusive approaches are needed. That is why we have been working with organisations across Wales already engaged in the day-today business of managing our natural resources and have used the 460 plus ideas we’ve received to develop the focus and priorities of the Nature Fund. ‘The fund will help us to deliver our commitment to the joinedup management of Wales’ natural resources and will complement our wider work to manage those resources in a way that improves our resilience and drives green growth. The Minister said that the £6m Nature fund would be used to support activity in seven selected geographical areas or Nature Action Zones specially chosen because of the challenges and opportunities they present for biodiversity and Wales’ natural resource action. The Nature Action Zones are: * Brecon Beacons – focusing on the Usk and Wye catchments * Cambrian mountains * Conwy Valley * Pembrokeshire coast * South Wales Valleys * Berwyn and Migneint * Llyn Peninsula The fund will support practical actions that are appropriate to the needs of each of the seven Nature Action Zones and will fund activity that tackles the decline in our biodiversity while delivering environmental, economic and social benefit. It will also recognise projects that demonstrate innovation, collaboration and good practice. Particular priority will be given to actions that improve river catchments, fisheries management and marine ecosystems, actions that enhance natural green spaces, actions that realise potential in the uplands and action that stimulates and develops the existing interest in a payment for eco systems service. Over the coming weeks the Welsh Government will work with partners to refine project proposals that will be funded during this financial year. The Welsh Government and Natural Resources Wales will work closely with partners to deliver the Fund, which will complement work already underway in Natural Resources Wales’ three trial areas. A small number of proposals outside of the Nature Action Zones will be considered if they demonstrate innovation and collaboration and can deliver key outcomes. The Welsh Government will be holding events in the seven selected Nature Action Zones in order to support the development of detailed projects.

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Farming

A way of life under threat

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THE CAMBRIAN MOUNTAINS, known as the backbone of Wales, is one of the country’s most secluded areas.

Described by the nineteenth-century English writer JH Cliffe as part of the ‘green desert of Wales’, stretching east across Mid Wales to the A470 and Rhaedr, south towards Builth Wells, west to Pumpsaint, and northwards to Llangurig, including the reservoirs of Nant y Moch and Llyn Clywedog.

In Drych: Hel y Mynydd, on S4C on Sunday, January 12 at 9.00 pm, we get to know some of the farmers and shepherds in this extraordinary area as they continue to round-up sheep in the traditional way on foot and on horseback – a tradition which is rapidly dying out.

One of those who continues the tradition is Glyndwr, the head shepherd for the Cwm Elan estate, who farms Claerwen with his wife Wendy: “I help to round-up and exchange sheep with neighbours. There aren’t many of us left who can round-up the sheep in a traditional way. You have to have a dog here or you might as well stay at home. Life is hectic here in the middle of summer as we round-up every day. There isn’t a single fence between me and my neighbours – to me, that’s a great way to live.”

“When you’re rounding-up you are in complete solitude. There isn’t a lot of this rounding-up business going on any longer, but we continue to do it here and it works here – and if it works, there’s no need to change it!”

The area has become a target for a number of English organisations who want to ‘rewild’ a landscape which exists only through thousands of years of human interaction and transform it into their idea of what Wales should look like.

Those schemes have met stiff resistance and one, in particular, Summit to the Sea, has managed to alienate a large number of farmers who would be affected by a variety of crackpot schemes that would force them off the land.

It becomes obvious during the programme that farmers on the open mountain are dependent on each other and offer help by rounding-up each other’s sheep.
We also meet Erwyd, an experienced shepherd from Ponterwyd: “While walking the mountains, a person gets to see the wonders of nature, this is what I call paradise. I feel a part of the place – it is completely unique.”

A reservoir was built in the Elan Valley in 1970 to supply water to cities in the midlands of England. Because of the reservoir, the landscape without fences has survived on the Cwm Elan estate and the farms all belong to the Cwm Elan Trust.

Clive, who farms at Hirnant in the Elan Valley adds: “There are no rules here, no-one makes money or loses money, everybody just helps one another. This must be one of the few places where if the old boys came back, they would show us a thing or two.”

Another who helps the crew is Gwyndaf – neighbour and shearer:
“The country folk think that the mountain boys don’t do anything, but it’s amazing what hard work it is. I can’t see there being any sheep left on the mountain in a few years.”

Following a day of rounding up, comes a day of shearing.

“Shearing day has always been an important day in the mountains’ calendar with the mountain community coming together. It’s one of those jobs that have to be done, but I love shearing.

I would shear every day of the year if I could!”

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Farming

2020 – A Year of Preparation

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THE NATIONAL Chairman of the Tenant Farmers Association (TFA), James Gray, says that the farming industry and the supply chains into which it feeds must be ‘match fit’ to both capitalise on the opportunities of life outside the European Union, as well as tackling the inevitable challenges that will arise.

“Whatever our thoughts about Brexit, the Prime Minister now has the Parliamentary arithmetic in his favour to confirm the UK’s exit from the European Union at the end of January. Through the eleven-month transition period to follow, we must focus not only on achieving a good trade deal with the EU but in ramping up our efforts to secure new export markets for our farming output further afield. As important as the domestic and EU markets are, we must work harder to sell ourselves more internationally. To this end, AHDB should concentrate its efforts in promoting market development,” said Mr Gray.

“We also need the Government to be working with us rather than against us. Allowing imports of food produced to standards which are illegal in the UK would be a catastrophe. The Government must not undermine our domestic market in attempting to gain market share for our financial services sector abroad. If our animal welfare and environmental standards are important to us, we must protect them at our borders. The Government must use a combination of regulatory standards and tariffs on imports to put our domestically produced, high-quality food in the strongest position in trade terms. As a mark of the Government’s support for our industry, it should require all public bodies involved in food procurement to prioritise food from domestic sources,” said Mr Gray.

“Retail and foodservice supply chains will also continue to need strong regulation to ensure fair treatment of primary producers. Indications from the outgoing Groceries Code Adjudicator that her role could continue on a part-time basis because of the successes she has achieved are at best premature and at worst naïve. By including supply chain measures in the previous Agriculture Bill the Government has recognised the need for a widening and deepening of the regulatory framework. We need a full-time adjudicator doing a full-time job across the whole of the retail and foodservice supply chains from farm to fork,” said Mr Gray.

“Within the tenanted sector of agriculture, we will also be looking to the Government to put in place much-needed reforms to the legislative and taxation frameworks within which agricultural tenancies operate. We need greater security of tenure to promote productivity and better environmental outcomes, opportunities for progression and new entrants, as well as routes to dignified retirement for those tenant farmers reaching the end of their farming careers. Directing all new policies and schemes to the needs of active farmers will be key,” said Mr Gray.

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Community

Welsh produce on GCSE menu

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AS A whirlwind of misinformation about how food is farmed and produced circulates on social, online and media platforms, it is more important than ever that children are aware of the facts and understand how ingredients reach their dinner-plate.

The education system in Wales is making an attempt to address this through the school curriculum.

All pupils studying for the GCSE in Food and Nutrition this year are expected to research traditional Welsh recipes and Welsh ingredients as part of the course and use that work as the inspiration for three dishes that showcase local produce.

Hybu Cig Cymru – Meat Promotion Wales’ (HCC) Market Development Manager, Rhys Llywelyn said: “We welcome the introduction of this task as part of the WJEC’s GCSE qualification in Food and Nutrition. It offers a good opportunity for students to learn more about red meat, how it’s produced, and how it can be prepared to create nutritious, tasty meals.

“It is also a chance to remind young people about Welsh Lamb and Welsh Beef’s Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status.”

Rhys recently visited pupils at Ysgol Bro Idris in Dolgellau to talk about red meat production in Wales.

He said: “As part of the session, I was able to focus particularly on Welsh Lamb, which is, of course, a roduct which has been perfected over generations by farmers in rural areas.

“We had a good discussion on how Welsh Lamb is traceable from farm to fork through its PGI status, which is appreciated by consumers. Also, with many of the students coming from farming families, it was very useful to raise some of the factors within the international food industry which influence the price that farmers receive for their livestock.”

The students received packs of literature, including nutritional information and recipes, to help them with their studies. As a follow-up, many of them attended the Royal Welsh Winter Fair to learn more about food and farming.

Teacher Angharad Davies said: “The students enjoyed the visit to the Winter Fair and were fascinated by the Welsh Lamb butchery demonstration which was held on the HCC stand. The butcher expertly showed how a carcase is broken down into the different cuts of meat which can be cooked in various ways. Rhys Llywelyn’s informative presentation has led them to think about how red meat is produced and how it can be prepared along with other, local Welsh ingredients that are available on our doorstep.”

This work is part of HCC’s wider educational activity, which has involved preparing classroom resources for the new Food and Nutrition GCSE as well as materials aimed at younger pupils, and a programme of teacher training events.

This provision will be developed further over the next twelve months, adding to HCC’s online resources and recipe videos, which will help children obtain a greater understanding of food culture, nutrition, and farming.

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