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Farming

Aussie trade deal sells out Welsh farmers

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THE WESTMINSTER government’s wish to conclude a zero-tariff trade deal with Australia will put the future of Welsh livestock farming at risk.

That’s the unanimous view of Welsh farming organisations, who are aghast that allowing products produced to lower animal welfare standards will threaten the viability of Welsh farms and have disastrous consequences for our rural economy.

Earlier this week, The Financial Times exposed tensions in the Westminster Cabinet between DEFRA and the Department of International Trade.

Ready to sacrifice farming for free trade deal: International Trade Secretary Liz Truss

The article said that George Eustice, Secretary of State for Rural Affairs and Cabinet Office Secretary Michael Gove opposed International Trade Secretary Liz Truss’ wish to conclude a post-Brexit trade deal at any cost.

THE PROMISE AND THE THREAT

In addition to potentially undermining the UK’s farming industry, there are serious concerns that cheaply produced new food imports will pressure livestock farmers to intensify their practices to compete. This would harm animal welfare and environmental standards across the UK.

Previous Secretary of States for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Michael Gove MP and Theresa Villiers MP, and the current Secretary of State, George Eustice MP, have repeatedly asserted the Government’s firm commitment to maintaining the UK’s high food and environmental standards in any circumstance.#

Despite this, key amendments to both the Agriculture Bill and the Trade Bill, aimed at safeguarding British standards and protecting UK producers were repeatedly defeated by the Government in Parliament.

In fact, due to loopholes in the recently passed Trade Bill, the Government will now be able to approve the import of animal and agricultural products of a lower standard than currently permitted in the UK and make sweeping changes to existing food safety regulations without consultation.

WG FEARS IMPACT ON RURAL WALES

Welsh Government ministers’ responses to the International Trade Secretary’s position were condemnatory.

Economy Minister, Vaughan Gething said: “Farmers and food producers play a crucial role in our society, economy and environment.

New trade deals must protect Welsh farmers: Vaughan Gething

“We have been very clear with the UK Government that any new trade deals must not cause an un-level playing field, by giving food importers with lower standards an economic advantage in our market compared to our own producers.

Rural Affairs Minister Lesley Griffiths added: “We are extremely proud of the high food safety standards we have here in Wales, including standards around animal health and welfare, traceability, environment and food safety.

“No trade agreement should ever undermine that or our domestic legislation, and Welsh Government has consistently made this point to the UK Government.”

We followed up those remarks by asking what representations the Welsh Government made and when.

A spokesperson told us: “We have frequent contact with UK Government, through both the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Department of International Trade at all stages of FTA negotiations. This includes weekly meetings on the Australian FTA.

“We are consistently clear in these meetings that new FTAs must not create an un-level playing field for our own producers.

Mark Drakeford: Raised concerns with Michael Gove on Wednesday

“The First Minister raised this issue with the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, Michael Gove MP on Wednesday afternoon (May 19).”

AUSSIE FREE TRADE DEAL WILL UNDERMINE STANDARDS

The same day, FUW President Glyn Roberts met with UK Trade Minister Greg Hands.

Speaking after the meeting, FUW President Glyn Roberts said: “Both the minister and I agreed wholeheartedly that we must seek new trade opportunities for UK agriculture and other industries.

“However, we made our concerns regarding the adverse impacts of a liberal deal with Australia very clear.”

Mr Roberts said that he and the Minister discussed a host of issues during the meeting, including the potential benefits for Welsh agriculture of the UK’s membership of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), which the UK is currently seeking.

Ministers must realise the price of free trade: Glyn Roberts, FUW

“The reality is that a deal that liberalises access to the UK market for Australian beef and lamb means a lowering of standards and will have adverse consequences for UK farmers.

“While this may not be an immediate concern given current exports to the UK, we have to look at what might happen in the future. After all, if Australia didn’t believe they would increase food exports to the UK significantly at some point, they wouldn’t be fighting so hard to ensure it is in a trade agreement.”

Mr Roberts said The union had also highlighted the gulf between the standards required of farmers in Wales and the UK and the far lower standards required in Australia.

“The Queen’s speech has just reiterated UK Government plans to tighten up animal movement rules, and Wales looks set to follow suit.

“Our current maximum animal journey time is already eight hours, but it is forty-eight hours – six times higher in Australia. Other concerns include the significant differences between animal traceability requirements, given that what is allowed in Australia would be completely illegal here.”

“The political pressure on the Government to announce a trade deal should not override the UK government’s duty to negotiate a deal that upholds its own promises and our values by preventing food produced to lower standards from being sold in the UK – however long that negotiation takes, or even if it means walking away from negotiations,” Mr Roberts added.

DOGMA TRUMPING OUR NATIONAL INTEREST

TFA Cymru Chairman Dennis Matheson told The Herald: “The UK Government is at risk of allowing politics to trump our national interest in being over keen to get a trade agreement over the line without properly thinking through its consequences.

“There is no pretence that, from the perspective of the agricultural industry, trade deals with Australia and New Zealand would not have been at the top of our agenda. Clearly, both countries have got their sights set on ramping up exports of beef, sheep, and dairy to the UK.

“Welsh farmers stand to lose out considerably if this comes to fruition. That will be hugely damaging to the Welsh economy, tourism, and the environment. We must ensure we do not let in imports which fall below the environmental and animal welfare requirements imposed upon producers in Wales.”

19 farming bodies across various sectors and from all four nations of the UK have agreed on five principles of crucial importance to UK food and farming in the negotiations.

NFU Cymru President John Davies said: “We know that agriculture is almost always the last chapter to be finalised in any trade deal, and as these talks reach an advanced stage its important negotiators take on board the five detailed principles agreed.

“The government’s repeated commitments to safeguard our own standards and not undercut UK farmers through unfair competition are encouraging, and we support their ambition to liberalise trade.

“We know that if we’re to open up the opportunities of new markets overseas for UK farmers, we will have to offer greater access to our own markets in return. However, this trade-off needs to be balanced, and we need to make sure concessions to our hugely valuable home market are not given away lightly.”

WESTMINSTER RISKS ‘IRREVERSIBLE DAMAGE’

NFU Cymru President John Davies: Westminster risking ‘irreversible damage to UK farming’

John Davies continued: “There is a very real risk that, if we get it wrong, UK farming will suffer irreversible damage rather than flourish in the way we all desire, to the detriment of our environment, our food security and our rural communities.

“The British government faces a choice. It must recognise that zero-tariff trade on all imports of products such as beef and lamb means British farming, working to its current high standards, will struggle to compete.

“At a time when government has placed huge importance on its aim of levelling up, this would fundamentally undermine any ambition to narrow the rural-urban divide or to ensure all parts of the UK are included in the government’s desire to build back in the months ahead.”

Julie Barratt, President of the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health said: “Despite repeated assurances from a string of Environment Secretaries, the mood music does not look good for UK food standards and animal welfare when it comes to this potential deal with Australia.

“Adopting a zero-tariff and zero-quota approach to food imports from Australia risks the UK market being flooded with cheaper produce and undercutting UK farmers, forcing our farmers to adopt lower standards just to be able to compete.

“There are also serious questions about how importing cheaper food from the other side of the world impacts on the UK’s food security or sustainability, or how it helps the Government meet its wider environmental pledges or commitment to achieving net-zero.

“We are calling on the UK Government to stick to its environmental commitments and to not undermine our high food standards in an attempt to get a trade deal over the line.”

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Farming

Sunak backs Welsh farmers in subsidy protest at Conservative Conference

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PRIME MINISTER Rishi Sunak has publicly expressed his support for Welsh farmers protesting against proposed changes to farm subsidies by the Labour-led Welsh government. The declaration came during the Welsh Conservative conference in Llandudno, where Sunak, alongside Pembrokeshire-based MS Sam Kurtz—who notably climbed onto a tractor in solidarity—met with protesting farmers, including campaigner Gareth Wyn Jones.

Addressing the concerns outside the conference venue, Sunak reassured the agricultural community, stating, “We’re going to do everything we can because we’ve got your back.” The farmers’ grievances stem from the Welsh government’s proposals, which include mandating the allocation of 10% of agricultural land for forestry and an additional 10% for wildlife habitat as part of the Sustainable Farming Scheme aimed at combating climate change. The Welsh government has defended its stance, emphasizing the scheme’s flexibility and the ongoing consultation process.

Sam Kurtz MS climbed into a tractor parked outside Venue Cymru (Image: Gareth Lewis/BBC)

The protest actions have escalated recently, with a significant demonstration expected in Cardiff next week. Amidst these developments, Sunak critiqued the Welsh government’s approach, highlighting the broader discontent with policies such as the controversial 20mph speed limit and perceived mismanagement in health and education sectors. In his speech, Sunak accused the Labour party of treating Wales as a “laboratory” for untested policies, causing “enormous anger” among the Welsh people.

The prime minister also addressed the economic outlook, citing reductions in inflation and energy prices and the initiation of mortgage rate declines as evidence of positive direction under his leadership. He leveraged the opportunity to criticize Labour’s immigration and environmental policies, contrasting them with the Conservative government’s achievements and future plans.

Controversially, Sunak’s support for the protesting farmers comes at a time when the UK government has been tightening legislation against disruptive protests. This stance raises questions about the potential implications of backing such protests, especially with a planned farmer demonstration in Cardiff, which, while expected to be orderly, poses a political risk for Sunak if it leads to disruption.

In response, the Welsh government has highlighted its commitment to supporting the agricultural sector, maintaining the Basic Payment Scheme at £238m in 2024, and developing the Sustainable Farming Scheme in partnership with the farming community to offer stability and support to all Welsh farmers.

The political discourse surrounding these protests and Sunak’s involvement illustrates the complex interplay between agricultural policy, environmental initiatives, and political strategy in Wales. As the situation unfolds, the impact of Sunak’s support for the farmers, against the backdrop of the UK’s post-Brexit agricultural policy landscape, remains to be seen, marking a critical moment in the ongoing debate over the future of farming and environmental stewardship in Wales.

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Farming

Police warn of disruption to traffic as farmers protests take place

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FARMERS protests are taking place in Aberystwyth and Carmarthen today (Feb 22.)

The police took to Facebook on Thursday morning saying: “We are aware of potential disruption to traffic in Carmarthen and Aberystwyth town centres from midday today.

“The traffic network in and out of the towns may also be affected.

“If you are planning on travelling in those areas today, please consider changing your route or journey time to avoid delays.

“We will update when we have further information.”

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Farming

Welsh Conservatives challenge Sustainable Farming Scheme in Senedd

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THE WELSH CONSERVATIVES have tabled a motion for debate in the Senedd, aiming to overturn the controversial Sustainable Farming Scheme (SFS) proposals put forward by the Labour Government. The motion, scheduled for discussion next Wednesday, 28th February, calls for the abolition of the requirement for a 10% tree cover on farms and the scrapping of the current SFS proposals, amidst concerns over their impact on Wales’ agricultural sector and rural communities.

According to the Labour Government’s economic impact assessment, the implementation of the SFS could lead to a drastic reduction of 122,200 in Welsh livestock numbers, the loss of 5,500 jobs, and a £199 million hit to the rural economy. These figures have fueled the argument that the scheme could devastate rural communities across Wales.

Sam Kurtz: Unhappy with proposed farming scheme

Samuel Kurtz MS, the Welsh Conservative Shadow Rural Affairs Minister, has been vocal in his criticism of the scheme. He stated, “The economic analysis of the Sustainable Farming Scheme speaks for itself. With the projected loss of livestock, jobs, and significant economic damage, it’s clear that the SFS will decimate Wales’ rural communities.” Kurtz accused the Labour Government of neglecting the importance of the farming industry to Wales’ economy, society, culture, and language, and of ignoring the widespread opposition to the SFS within the agricultural community.

The motion presented by the Welsh Conservatives outlines the significant concerns surrounding the SFS, including the estimated reductions in livestock numbers, job losses on Welsh farms, and the consequent economic downturn. It also highlights the agricultural community’s strong opposition to the scheme and cites a poll commissioned by the Country Land and Business Association in Wales, which found that only 3% of Welsh farmers trust the Welsh Government’s handling of the issue.

In a bid to address these concerns, the motion calls on the Welsh Government to remove the tree cover requirement and to scrap the current SFS proposals. Furthermore, it urges the government to re-engage with the farming sector to develop a new scheme that garners the support of the farming community.

The debate, which is a crucial moment for the future of farming in Wales, is set to commence at approximately 5.30 pm on Wednesday, 28th February, in the Welsh Parliament. This marks a significant effort by the Welsh Conservatives to align with the farming sector and challenge what they see as detrimental policies towards rural Wales.

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