Connect with us
Advertisement
Advertisement

Business

Language skills’ decline threatens tourism

Published

on

'But everybody speaks English!': Language skills gap undermines tourism industry

A REPORT released by leading travel trade association UKinbound, has uncovered a growing language skills gap facing the UK tourism industry, caused by a combination of Brexit and the decline of language training in the UK.

The new research undertaken by Canterbury Christ Church University highlights the current lack of capacity in the UK’s education system to meet the shortfall in higher level language skills which are badly needed by the UK’s inbound tourism industry.

To date, tourism organisations have been largely reliant on EU nationals for their technical and ‘soft’ language skills and concerns are rising in the industry about the attrition of these employees. Approximately 130,000 EU nationals departed the UK in the year to September 2017– the highest number since 2008.

Furthermore, a sharp decline in the number of young people studying a foreign language, arising in part from changes to government policy since 2002, combined with a lack of awareness of the opportunities and career paths open to language proficient graduates in the tourism and hospitality sector, are major contributors to the widening language skills gap in the sector, at a time when access to future EU employees is uncertain.

Key findings of the research:

Of the 78 institutions offering tourism and/or hospitality undergraduate programmes in the UK, only 25 offer languages as part of their tourism/hospitality curriculum.

45 institutions offer 87 postgraduate tourism/hospitality programmes – yet only 6% of these programmes offer a language, as an optional module.

The audit identifies Institution Wide Language Provision and study abroad opportunities as alternative ways for students to add an international dimension to their studies

From a sample of 43 higher education institutions that offer a single honours modern language degree programme, only 16 mention tourism as a career prospect.

Interviews with modern language programme directors highlighted a lack of knowledge of the tourism sector and tourism specific career pathways.

The report also features an Evidence Review, drawing on data from previously conducted research and reports, creating a clearer picture regarding the diminishing supply of home-grown linguists

Pupils taking languages at A-level fell by a 1/3 in 20 years (1996-2016)

French declined from 22.7k to 8.5k

German from 9.3k to 3.4k

Spanish increased from 4.1k to 7.5k.

German is no longer a dominant language taken at A-level. French and Spanish continue to be key languages, despite the declining popularity of French.

There has been an uptake in the study of key UK inbound growth market languages; Mandarin and Arabic, but the growth of the talent pool here is slow and limited.

Social, regional and gender inequalities in the uptake of languages are striking.

The number of UK universities offering language degrees has dropped by 30% between 2000 and 2015.

Deirdre Wells OBE, chief executive officer, UKinbound said, “The UK is currently the fifth most visited country in the world and our inbound tourism industry in 2017 contributed an estimated £25 billion to the UK economy. Those working in tourism need to be able to communicate effectively with their international visitors and our tour operators in particular need employees who can communicate confidently and negotiate contracts with overseas operators and suppliers. The industry currently employs large numbers of workers from the European Union to fulfil these roles, but our members are reporting that many of their EU employees are starting to return home. They are struggling to find replacements from within the British workforce, predominantly due to their lack of advanced language skills.

“This report clearly shows that the country needs leadership from the very highest levels to address this impending language crisis, to ensure the tourism industry continues to provide world class customer service and remains competitive in the global marketplace.”

Dr Karen Thomas, Director of the Tourism and Events Research Hub, at Canterbury Christ Church University added: “The uncertainty of the Brexit negotiations appears to have pushed the tourism and hospitality sectors to a critical point, where they not only have to consider the valuable role of EU workers, but also need to evaluate the potential of home-grown talent to meet the needs of the future inbound tourism industry. This research is particularly timely given the body of evidence which has been developing about the decline of home-grown linguists and the potential this has to impact on UK productivity and competitiveness in a post-Brexit landscape. For the UK inbound tourism industry, where language skills and intercultural understanding are crucial in business and consumer-facing roles, the findings of this study raise challenging issues to be addressed by a wide range of stakeholders.”

UKinbound also recently surveyed its members regarding their need for graduates with language skills. Just 34% of members had employed graduates with language skills in the last five years, but 65% of members are now considering employing graduates with language skills in the next five years.

The report findings coincide with the launch of UKinbound’s campaign to highlight the contribution of tourism from EU countries to the UK economy, and to impress on the Government the urgency of securing either no, or minimal, barriers to inbound tourism from the EU post Brexit.

Wells added, “In 2017, two-thirds of inbound visitors came from the EU and contributed an estimated £10 billion to the UK economy. We are calling on the Government therefore to prioritise the need for minimal disruption to this flow of visitors in the Brexit negotiations. Any onerous entry requirements post Brexit will hurt the sector, the economy and cost jobs and any delay risks undermining the sectors ability to prepare for the post Brexit environment.”

The tourism industry is the UK’s third largest employer, employing 3.1 million people (over 9.6% of the UK workforce) and contributes £126 billion to the UK economy, (7.1% of GDP). The UK receives 67% of its tourists from the EU.

Business

Double acquisition as Certas Energy acquires two Pembrokeshire filling stations

Published

on

CERTAS ENERGY has added two West Wales fillings stations to its growing company portfolio with the acquisition of Square & Compass and Letterson Filling Stations, both formerly owned by Roger and Anne Shackleton.

The couple have operated their Pembrokeshire forecourt business for 22 years, its two Gulf branded forecourts are integral to the local community, with large and successful convenience stores and a combined fuel volume of 5.6ml.

“We are delighted to have concluded this deal, it’s a very good fit for our business as we continue to grow our company operation across the UK,” enthuses Richard Billington, Retail Director, Certas Energy. “We already have a strong Gulf presence within Pembrokeshire and these two flagship sites will complement our thriving and expanding Dealer operation.”

“Anne and Roger have put their heart and soul into their business and its standing within the locality is testament to their hard work and that of a very talented team, whom we look forward to working with. We’ll bring the sites into harmony with the rest of our company-owned operation, investing in the latest back-office technology and on-site facilities to future proof the business. We will also remain true to the values established by the Shackletons to be at the heart of the local community.”

Square and Compass filling station in north Pembrokeshire

The two forecourts currently employ 20 people. They are seven miles apart, both situated in the town of Haverfordwest. Dave Morris, Director at specialist business property adviser, Christie & Co, acted on behalf of owners Anne and Roger and comments; “The two forecourts presented a great opportunity for a buyer as they are in a good location and well regarded locally. It has been a pleasure to work for Anne and Roger who have been passionate fuel retailers for over 20 years and we wish them all the best with their retirement. Both sites are a good fit for Certas Energy and we look forward to seeing them transition into Certas’ company owned portfolio.”

Reflecting on his departure from the business, Roger Shackleton says: “We have fantastic staff and a successful business that has been nurtured to the needs of our community. I’ve loved every minute of the ever changing environment of forecourt and convenience retailing. I still get up every morning at 4am to prepare for the day ahead but now seems the right time to retire. Certas Energy and Gulf Retail are better suited to unlock the future potential and get the very best out of our two sites. It’s a very emotive time for us both, we regard our staff as family but we know they are in good hands. The Gulf team are genuine, the process has been relatively smooth and David Morris of Christie and Co. has been brilliant, working tirelessly keep the deal progressing and to get us to this place.”

“When we drive past the sites in the future, we may feel saddened that we are no longer at the helm but in Gulf Retail, we are happy that we have sold to the right people.”

This latest acquisition by Certas Energy increases its company portfolio to 35 sites as it continues to grow the Gulf network in size and scale.

Fuel family’s final farewell

IT WAS an emotional farewell at two north Pembrokeshire filling stations this week as the popular owners Roger and Anne Shackleton handed the reigns over to new owners Certas Energy, Britain’s largest independent distributor of fuels and lubricants.

Staff at Letterston filling station say good bye to old owners Roger and Anne

After 22 years, Roger and Anne are looking forward to a more relaxed life on their farm, and to see more of their family, they told The Herald.

In 1997, the couple sold their pedigree herd and bought Letterston Filling Station. In 2007 Square and Compass Filling Station was purchased and plans were made to rebuild the shop into a convenience store to serve the neighbourhood. They were able to provide a wide range of goods and competitive fuel prices over a long period at both sites, an important resource for the local community in both cases.

The staff at Square and Compass filling station

Roger and Anne said in a statement: “We would like to thank our suppliers, and the loyal and long-standing customers for their support over the years. A final thank you goes to the staff, past and present that have helped make the business what it is today.

They added: “We would like to extend our best wishes to Certas Energy for success in the future with both Letterston and Square and Compass Filling Stations.”

Continue Reading

Business

Solva: Farm’s new ice cream enterprise is a family affair

Published

on

WITH views over the stunning Pembrokeshire coastline, Pointz Castle Ice Cream’s new on-farm parlour is the perfect place for a refreshing treat on a hot summer’s day.

Pointz Castle Ice Cream is a family collaboration spanning four generations, located on the Lawrence family’s farm located between the fishing village of Solva and the expansive sandy beach of Newgale, on the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park.

Richard and Gill Lawrence and their son William, daughter Rachael, daughter-in-law Lydia, and son-in-law Thomas all bring a range of skills which enabled them to establish and run the new business.

While the critical job of tasting the final product is down to the youngest – and oldest – members of the family: grandchildren Charlie, Freddie, Rhodri, Rebecca and Beatrice (who range in age from one to seven-years-old), and Gill’s father Leslie.

Rachael with Beatrice, Lydia with Rebecca, and William. (Pic Coleman Communications)

The step into making ice cream is a new chapter for the family, explains William, who with his sister Rachael makes the ice cream.

“Against a backdrop of continuing volatility in the dairy sector, coupled with the uncertainty created around Brexit, we decided to fulfil a long-term ambition for adding value to the milk we produce. Based on our coastal setting and growing tourism industry, ice cream was the natural fit.

“Located on the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, this corner of Wales possesses both a fantastic climate for producing grass for the milk required for our ice cream and in an area of spectacular scenery and coastal walks for our visitors to relax and enjoy.”

Visitors to the ice cream parlour can enjoy a complete cow to cone experience, enjoying the creamy, smooth texture ice cream and sorbets in some of the 70 different flavours.

Says William, “We use locally sourced ingredients such as cream, and Halen Dewi- St Davids Sea Salt to create some of the flavours which include Blueberry Pannacotta, Strawberry Cheesecake and Lemon & Mascarpone as well as the firm favourites Vanilla, Raspberry Ripple and Chocolate. The flavours on display in the cabinet alternate regularly and may well include a seasonal special such as Welsh Cake, Pumpkin or Mince Pie flavour.”

As well as ice cream, coffee and cake can be enjoyed in the traditional stone built converted cow shed with wooden beams and whitewashed walls or just sit and relax outside in the sun trapped courtyard watching the cows coming in for milking.

As the café is set within a working farm, this provides an opportunity to explain to visitors what farming entails.

Says William, “We calve in the spring and autumn, and that has been a real attraction for people who have different levels of knowledge about farming. It sparks all sorts of questions and helps people connect to where their food comes from. They come away knowing that the grass the cows were grazing today will produce tomorrows ice cream.”

As well as the on-farm cafe, the business takes their ice cream on the road with a converted vintage trailer available for all occasions from weddings to festivals.

The family has had help with its new venture from the Food Centre Wales at Horeb, and from Cywain – a Menter a Busnes delivered project that supports the development of growth orientated businesses in the food and drink sector in Wales.

“Setting up a new business has had its challenges,” says William, “but Cywain has been great. They have excellent contacts and have been able to put us in touch with people who have helped us to launch the business.’. They have kept us going and signposted us to any assistance and training we’ve needed.”

Steeped in history, the dairy, beef and arable farm is on the site of a Norman castle, with the raised mound of the original motte-and-bailey castle still visible while a public footpath links the farm to Porthmynawyd, a small cove west of Newgale Sands.

But it is not only the ice cream and café side of the business that has attracted visitors in their droves. Should the weather prove to be less than perfect Pointz Castle has got it covered – literally!

The area is popular with holidaymakers, many of whom are families drawn by Pembrokeshire’s magnificent beaches and lush countryside. Therefore, with the enjoyment of children – and parents – in mind, the Lawrence family recently created indoor play facilities at Pointz Castle.

There children can enjoy farm-themed activities including riding on toy tractors and diggers, as well as view the young dairy calves.
Continuing the educational theme, customers are also able to try milking a life-sized model cow for themselves in the play barn.

Says William, “In Pembrokeshire, we’re not guaranteed good weather, so we created the play area in the barn to give families another entertainment option. Our children have been very much involved in building it, and it is proving very popular!”
Said Lowri Davies of Cywain, “We are delighted to be part of the Pointz Castle story. By diversifying into producing ice cream the family is helping to showcase the flavours of Pembrokeshire, and at the same time opening a window for visitors on dairy farming in Wales.”

Continue Reading

Business

Port of Milford Haven appoint Andy Jones as Chief Executive

Published

on

THE PORT of Milford Haven has appointed Andy Jones as its new Chief Executive. Andy, who has been with the organisation for eight years, starts his position with immediate effect.

Andy brings much needed experience and expertise, drawn from his years as Deputy Chief Executive and Finance Director, at a time when the UK’s largest energy port is moving to diversify earnings and develop new business opportunities.

Chris Martin, Chairman at the Port of Milford Haven, said: “Following a rigorous recruitment process it gives me great pleasure to announce Andy Jones as the Port’s new Chief Executive. Andy has an excellent grasp of the Port’s vision as well as the challenges it currently faces. Whilst wholeheartedly championing our two flagship projects – Milford Waterfront and Pembroke Dock Marine – Andy brings a thorough and realistic approach to the delivery of our diversification plans whilst prioritising the continued delivery of excellent and safe port operations.

“Andy’s knowledge, skills and personality have enabled him to build solid relationships with our customers and stakeholders and I am confident his appointment will be welcomed by them all.”

Andy Jones said: “I feel a huge sense of excitement about the future for our organisation and I am really pleased to be in a position to continue advancing the opportunities ports have to act as catalyst locations for the growth of key UK industries.

“In Wales, and certainly in Pembrokeshire, we have particular strengths in the marine renewables, leisure and tourism sectors. Through our Pembroke Dock Marine Project, part of the Swansea Bay City Deal, and the development of Milford Waterfront, we aim to deliver vibrant spaces which will underpin our regional economy and attract new investment, offering life-long career opportunities for future generations.

“There is a fantastic team working at the Port of Milford Haven and I am delighted to be continuing as part of that team.”

Continue Reading
News4 days ago

RNLI crew offer assistance to casualties on board yacht

ST DAVIDS’ Tamar class lifeboat launched at 7.42am on July 17 to a 11m yacht approximately nine miles west of...

News5 days ago

Port builds on commitment to renewable energy

THE PORT OF MILFORD HAVEN says it has continued its commitment to renewable energy by switching its energy provider to...

News5 days ago

Natural Resources Wales consultation on Pembroke Dock waste permit

NRW has received an application from Pembrokeshire County Council to change its environmental permit for a waste transfer station in...

News5 days ago

Police now the ’24/7 default service’ for mental health

DYFED-POWYS POLICE deals with around 200 mental health incidents every week, its Chief Constable has told members of the Dyfed...

Education5 days ago

Well done Gemma, you are an inspiration to us all

A SINGLE mum of seven who left school with no qualifications is celebrating after gaining a degree from Swansea University....

News6 days ago

Campaign to ensure Tenby continues to be ‘safe and popular’

OPERATION LION is a partnership initiative involving Dyfed-Powys Police, British Transport Police, Transport for Wales, Great Western Railway, Pembrokeshire Local...

News6 days ago

Get ready for a Robin Hood Adventure at Carew Castle

FAMOUS outlaw Robin Hood exchanges Sherwood Forest for Carew Castle next week and invites visitors to enjoy a Robin Hood...

News6 days ago

Commissioner defends policing levels in Dyfed Powys

THE DYFED-POWYS Police and Crime Commissioner has defended police numbers but confirmed work is underway to take an in-depth look...

News6 days ago

Dale Road fatal collision victim named as Laurence Stephens, 38

POLICE investigating a fatal collision in Haverfordwest are appealing to speak to a woman at the scene, as a tribute...

News7 days ago

Police letter ending grants case raises new questions

IN A LETTER to Council Chief Executive Ian Westley, Dyfed Powys Police have confirmed that NO prosecutions will take place...

Popular This Week